On Independence

The defiance and devotion expressed in these verses, are an excellent illustration of the spirit of the times, in which they were written. The author, Dr. Jonathan Mitchell Sewall, 1 of New Hampshire, composed many poems and patriotic songs. His ode of War and Washington is familiar to every one.


COME all you brave soldiers, both valiant and free,
It's for Independence we all now agree;
Let us gird on our swords, and prepare to defend,
Our liberty, property, ourselves and our friends.

In a cause that's so righteous, come let us agree,
And from hostile invaders set America free,
The cause is so glorious we need not to fear,
But from merciless tyrants we'll set ourselves clear.

Heaven's blessing attending us, no tyrant shall say,
That Americans e'er to such monsters gave way,
But fighting we'll die in America's cause,
Before we'll submit to tyrannical laws.

George the Third, of Great Britain, no more shall he reign,
With unlimited sway o'er these free States again,
Lord North, nor old Bute, nor none of their clan,
Shall ever be honor'd by an American.

May Heaven's blessings descend on our United States, And grant that the union may never abate;
May love, peace, and harmony, ever be found,
For to go hand in hand America round.

Upon our grand Congress may Heaven bestow,
Both wisdom and skill our good to pursue;
On Heaven alone dependent we'll be,
But from all earthly tyrants we mean to be free.

Unto our brave Generals may Heaven give skill,
Our armies to guide, and the sword for to wield,
May their hands taught to war, and their fingers to fight, Be able to put British armies to flight.

And now, brave Americans, since it is so,
That we are independent, we'll have them to know,
That united we are, and united we'll be,
And from all British tyrants we'll try to keep free.

May Heaven smile on us in all our endeavors
Safe guard our seaports, our towns, and our rivers, Keep us from invaders by land and by sea,
And from all who'd deprive us of our liberty.

1 Jonathan M. Sewall was born in 1749. Being adopted by his uncle, Chief Justice Stephen Sewall, of Massachusetts, he studied law, and in 1774 was Register of Probate for Grafton County, N. H. He afterwards removed to Portsmouth, where he died March 29, 1808. - Allen's Biographical Dictionary.